Jun 222017
 

Python3 code is below…

also available at this Gitlab link

https://gitlab.com/Alex-rtnVFRmedia/pagertest2

# control the Arduino RF22 pager TX # modified ON1ARF code # # 2017-06-23 Alex The Engineer # The Rat's Nest, Ipswich UK # # import serial import pprint import sys from colorconsole import terminal from colored import fg, bg, attr import readline # global colours res=attr('reset') # tty open now coded as a function # # colored module used here instead of colorconsole/screen object # just in case there isn't a global screen object available # def page(ttydev,capcode,function,repeats,message): # # create msg bytearray (NB: there should be more error # checking here # msg=(b'P ') msg+=(b'%07d' % capcode)+(b' ') msg+=(b'%01d' % function)+(b' ') msg+=(b'%01d' % repeats)+(b' ') msg+=(message)+(b'\r') print (fg(80),bg(0x12),'** opening tty:',ttydev+res) # serial port open with error checking this time try: ser = serial.Serial(ttydev, timeout=3) except serial.SerialException: print(res) sys.exit("** ERROR: cannot open tty\n\n") # if we got here everything is OK # RTS/DTR does not actually need to be flipped # as opening the tty does that anyway # which saves some time starting up the arduino comms # ser.setRTS(True) # ser.setRTS(False) # # get the lines from the buffer print (fg(0x0b),bg(0x15),'** tty open OK: >>check TX<<'+res) ibuf = ser.readlines() print (fg(202)) #pprint.pprint(ibuf) print (' ibuf[0] :',ibuf[0]) print (' ibuf[-1] :',ibuf[-1]) # check to see what came down comms line is expected if ibuf[0] != (b'RF22 init OK\r\n'): print(res) sys.exit("** ERROR: RF22 init error\n\n") if ibuf[-1] != (b'F <freqmhz> <freq100Hz>\r\n'): print(res) sys.exit("** ERROR: RF22 comms error\n\n") # if TX has correctly initialised now send message ser.write(msg) # get a line back from TTY, it should be exactly same as msg # but with a \n after it # if it hasn't something has gone wrong check=ser.readline() print(fg(0x50),'<< from tty:',fg(0x72),bg(0x08),check,res,fg(0x52)) if check != (msg+b'\n'): print(res) sys.exit("** ERROR: pager comms error\n\n") print (' ++ comms to pager TX OK ++') # get data returned over comms link # and now echo it with some pretty colours 🙂 colindex=0x70 while True: data=ser.readline() # only print it if a sending confirmation if data==(b'POCSAG SEND\r\n'): print (fg(0x30),'<< from tty:',fg(colindex),data) colindex += 1 if data==(b'F <freqmhz> <freq100Hz>\r\n'): break # all done, close tty print (fg(0x28),'** message sent correctly **\n') ser.close() def header(scr): scr = terminal.get_terminal(conEmu=False) scr.clear() scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x52) scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.print_at(2,0,"rtn telecom : pagertest 1.00") scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) scr.gotoXY(2,3) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x20) print('capcode:') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(10,3) print(' ') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) scr.gotoXY(20,3) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x20) print('alert:') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(26,3) print(' ') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) scr.gotoXY(2,5) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x20) print('message:') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(10,5) print(' ') scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) scr.gotoXY(0,9) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x28) # to be developed, input capcode def get_capcode(scr,default): pass # display capcode in input box def disp_capcode(scr,capcode): scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(10,3) print (str((b'%07d' % capcode),'utf-8')) scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) # display alert code in input box def disp_alert(scr,alert): scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(26,3) print (str((b'%01d' % alert),'utf-8')) scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) # display message in input box def disp_msg(scr,message): scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0x08) scr.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x78) scr.gotoXY(10,5) print (str(message,'utf-8')) scr.xterm256_set_bk_color(0) scr.gotoXY(0,9) # # main code now starts here # # initialise the screen # # 2017-06-23: now accepts interactive input of message # # a blank line transmits the hardcoded message # # 'q' exits the code # while True: # refresh the header screen = terminal.get_terminal(conEmu=False) header(screen) # message now split into capcode, function (0-3), repeats # and 40 character bytearray # # hardcoded values # capcode = 20008 function = 2 repeats = 1 message = b'rtn: miauw naar de maan!<<<pagertest>>>' ttydev="/dev/ttyACM0" # display the capcode and alert that are currently hardcoded # but leave the msg box blank as it now accepts user input # disp_capcode(screen,capcode) disp_alert(screen,function) # # create a quick and dirty coloured prompt for the input # screen.gotoXY(2,7) screen.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x38) print('------>') screen.gotoXY(10,7) screen.xterm256_set_fg_color(0x68) # # this uses readline so has some basic editing functions # # anything over 40 character is clipped # ms1=input() if ms1 !='': message=ms1[0:40].encode('utf-8') if ms1 =='q': break # # display the msg in the top box and transmit it # disp_msg(screen,message) page(ttydev,capcode,function,repeats,message) # # terminate script and reset all the console colours # print (fg(0xc8),'\n++ Script completed sucessfully ++\n',res)
pagertest2.py
Jan 242017
 

These UHF portable radio sets are good value, [I am obtaining some for use by the janitorial and maintenance teams at work] but the supplied mains chargers aren’t the safest design – and like most similar chargers they also cook the accus if they are left on charge constantly which often happens when these sets are used by less technically minded endusers.

Update: Newer versions of this radio sold on Amazon are now supplied with a desk charger with a USB plug; it seems Baofeng have been monitoring the various comments from European users (and their modifications to the chargers) widely posted on blogs and social media (fair play to them!)

This is of course much safer and can also be used with any suitable USB power supply including cigarette lighter adapters for vehicles, but there are still a fair few units being sold with the mains powered desktop charger as well as many others in regular use worldwide.

You can also get better 6 unit chargers from HongKong which have a separate low voltage PSU (similar in size to a laptop charger) that connects to the desktop unit but in the meantime I investigated and modified one of the chargers I already have to make it slightly safer – a fiddly and awkward job due to the way this cheap charger is constructed.

ATTENTION: Don’t try this unless you are confident with working on mains voltage equipment!

Below are some pictures showing whats inside, a very simplified explanation of how this kind of charger works and why changing the cable is a good idea (I also used a better plug with a 5A fuse). The good news is that it all worked when I put the case back together (I definitely wasn’t going to attempt testing it with the live PCB exposed), and the output voltage at the terminals was correct (compared with that of an identical unit)

overview of SMPSU repair & operationoverview of SMPSU repair & operation

Feb 062016
 

Since putting this project on Youtube I’ve had a surprising amount of interest from across the world about the modifications I made to the original code from ON1ARF ( a radioamateur in België) to allow 1200 and 2400 bps pager transmissions as well as the default 512bps (I wanted to use the circuit to test commercial POCSAG pager receivers used at one site at my work).

The original code is here

https://github.com/on1arf/pocsag

To get 1200 and 2400 bps you must alter the radiohead libraries it depends on.

Two files must change – the first is RH_RF22.cpp. The code snippet is below (cut and paste this into your editor)

// These are indexed by the values of ModemConfigChoice // Canned modem configurations generated with // http://www.hoperf.com/upload/rf/RH_RF22B%2023B%2031B%2042B%2043B%20Register%20Settings_RevB1-v5.xls // Stored in flash (program) memory to save SRAM PROGMEM static const RH_RF22::ModemConfig MODEM_CONFIG_TABLE[] = { { 0x2b, 0x03, 0xf4, 0x20, 0x41, 0x89, 0x00, 0x36, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x10, 0x62, 0x2c, 0x00, 0x08 }, // Unmodulated carrier { 0x2b, 0x03, 0xf4, 0x20, 0x41, 0x89, 0x00, 0x36, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x10, 0x62, 0x2c, 0x33, 0x08 }, // FSK, PN9 random modulation, 2, 5 // All the following enable FIFO with reg 71 // 1c, 1f, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 2c, 2d, 2e, 58, 69, 6e, 6f, 70, 71, 72 // FSK, No Manchester, Max Rb err <1%, Xtal Tol 20ppm { 0x2b, 0x03, 0xf4, 0x20, 0x41, 0x89, 0x00, 0x36, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x10, 0x62, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x08 }, // 2, 5 { 0x1b, 0x03, 0x41, 0x60, 0x27, 0x52, 0x00, 0x07, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x13, 0xa9, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x3a }, // 2.4, 36 { 0x1d, 0x03, 0xa1, 0x20, 0x4e, 0xa5, 0x00, 0x13, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x27, 0x52, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x48 }, // 4.8, 45 { 0x1e, 0x03, 0xd0, 0x00, 0x9d, 0x49, 0x00, 0x45, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x20, 0x80, 0x60, 0x4e, 0xa5, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x48 }, // 9.6, 45 { 0x2b, 0x03, 0x34, 0x02, 0x75, 0x25, 0x07, 0xff, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1b, 0x80, 0x60, 0x9d, 0x49, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x0f }, // 19.2, 9.6 { 0x02, 0x03, 0x68, 0x01, 0x3a, 0x93, 0x04, 0xd5, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x09, 0xd5, 0x0c, 0x22, 0x1f }, // 38.4, 19.6 { 0x06, 0x03, 0x45, 0x01, 0xd7, 0xdc, 0x07, 0x6e, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x2d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x0e, 0xbf, 0x0c, 0x22, 0x2e }, // 57.6. 28.8 { 0x8a, 0x03, 0x60, 0x01, 0x55, 0x55, 0x02, 0xad, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x50, 0x80, 0x60, 0x20, 0x00, 0x0c, 0x22, 0xc8 }, // 125, 125 // { 0x2b, 0x03, 0xa1, 0xe0, 0x10, 0xc7, 0x00, 0x09, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x04, 0x32, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x04 }, // 512 baud, FSK, 2.5 Khz fd for POCSAG compatibility { 0x27, 0x03, 0xa1, 0xe0, 0x10, 0xc7, 0x00, 0x06, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x09, 0xd5, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x07 }, // 1200 baud, FSK, 4.5 Khz fd for POCSAG compatibility // { 0x27, 0x03, 0xa1, 0xe0, 0x10, 0xc7, 0x00, 0x06, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x04, 0x32, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x07 }, // 512 baud, FSK, 4.5 Khz fd for POCSAG compatibility // 2400 bps { 0x27, 0x03, 0xa1, 0xe0, 0x10, 0xc7, 0x00, 0x06, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x13, 0xa9, 0x2c, 0x22, 0x07 },// 2400 baud, FSK, 4.5 Khz fd for POCSAG compatibility // GFSK, No Manchester, Max Rb err <1%, Xtal Tol 20ppm // These differ from FSK only in register 71, for the modulation type { 0x2b, 0x03, 0xf4, 0x20, 0x41, 0x89, 0x00, 0x36, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x10, 0x62, 0x2c, 0x23, 0x08 }, // 2, 5 { 0x1b, 0x03, 0x41, 0x60, 0x27, 0x52, 0x00, 0x07, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x13, 0xa9, 0x2c, 0x23, 0x3a }, // 2.4, 36 { 0x1d, 0x03, 0xa1, 0x20, 0x4e, 0xa5, 0x00, 0x13, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x27, 0x52, 0x2c, 0x23, 0x48 }, // 4.8, 45 { 0x1e, 0x03, 0xd0, 0x00, 0x9d, 0x49, 0x00, 0x45, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x20, 0x80, 0x60, 0x4e, 0xa5, 0x2c, 0x23, 0x48 }, // 9.6, 45 { 0x2b, 0x03, 0x34, 0x02, 0x75, 0x25, 0x07, 0xff, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1b, 0x80, 0x60, 0x9d, 0x49, 0x2c, 0x23, 0x0f }, // 19.2, 9.6 { 0x02, 0x03, 0x68, 0x01, 0x3a, 0x93, 0x04, 0xd5, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x1e, 0x80, 0x60, 0x09, 0xd5, 0x0c, 0x23, 0x1f }, // 38.4, 19.6 { 0x06, 0x03, 0x45, 0x01, 0xd7, 0xdc, 0x07, 0x6e, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x2d, 0x80, 0x60, 0x0e, 0xbf, 0x0c, 0x23, 0x2e }, // 57.6. 28.8 { 0x8a, 0x03, 0x60, 0x01, 0x55, 0x55, 0x02, 0xad, 0x40, 0x0a, 0x50, 0x80, 0x60, 0x20, 0x00, 0x0c, 0x23, 0xc8 }, // 125, 125 // OOK, No Manchester, Max Rb err <1%, Xtal Tol 20ppm { 0x51, 0x03, 0x68, 0x00, 0x3a, 0x93, 0x01, 0x3d, 0x2c, 0x11, 0x28, 0x80, 0x60, 0x09, 0xd5, 0x2c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 1.2, 75 { 0xc8, 0x03, 0x39, 0x20, 0x68, 0xdc, 0x00, 0x6b, 0x2a, 0x08, 0x2a, 0x80, 0x60, 0x13, 0xa9, 0x2c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 2.4, 335 { 0xc8, 0x03, 0x9c, 0x00, 0xd1, 0xb7, 0x00, 0xd4, 0x29, 0x04, 0x29, 0x80, 0x60, 0x27, 0x52, 0x2c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 4.8, 335 { 0xb8, 0x03, 0x9c, 0x00, 0xd1, 0xb7, 0x00, 0xd4, 0x28, 0x82, 0x29, 0x80, 0x60, 0x4e, 0xa5, 0x2c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 9.6, 335 { 0xa8, 0x03, 0x9c, 0x00, 0xd1, 0xb7, 0x00, 0xd4, 0x28, 0x41, 0x29, 0x80, 0x60, 0x9d, 0x49, 0x2c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 19.2, 335 { 0x98, 0x03, 0x9c, 0x00, 0xd1, 0xb7, 0x00, 0xd4, 0x28, 0x20, 0x29, 0x80, 0x60, 0x09, 0xd5, 0x0c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 38.4, 335 { 0x98, 0x03, 0x96, 0x00, 0xda, 0x74, 0x00, 0xdc, 0x28, 0x1f, 0x29, 0x80, 0x60, 0x0a, 0x3d, 0x0c, 0x21, 0x08 }, // 40, 335 };
RH_RF22.cpp

Also the header file RH_RF22.h must change so the modemconfig table has values that reflect the changed modulation schemes.

typedef enum { UnmodulatedCarrier = 0, ///< Unmodulated carrier for testing FSK_PN9_Rb2Fd5, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2kbs, Fd = 5kHz, PN9 random modulation for testing FSK_Rb2Fd5, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2kbs, Fd = 5kHz FSK_Rb2_4Fd36, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2.4kbs, Fd = 36kHz FSK_Rb4_8Fd45, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 4.8kbs, Fd = 45kHz FSK_Rb9_6Fd45, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 9.6kbs, Fd = 45kHz FSK_Rb19_2Fd9_6, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 19.2kbs, Fd = 9.6kHz FSK_Rb38_4Fd19_6, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 38.4kbs, Fd = 19.6kHz FSK_Rb57_6Fd28_8, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 57.6kbs, Fd = 28.8kHz FSK_Rb125Fd125, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 125kbs, Fd = 125kHz FSK_Rb_1200Fd4_5, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 1200bs, Fd = 4.5kHz, for POCSAG compatibility // FSK_Rb_512Fd4_5, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 512bs, Fd = 4.5kHz, for POCSAG compatibility FSK_Rb_2400Fd4_5, ///< FSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2400bs, Fd = 4.5kHz, for POCSAG compatibility GFSK_Rb2Fd5, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2kbs, Fd = 5kHz GFSK_Rb2_4Fd36, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 2.4kbs, Fd = 36kHz GFSK_Rb4_8Fd45, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 4.8kbs, Fd = 45kHz GFSK_Rb9_6Fd45, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 9.6kbs, Fd = 45kHz GFSK_Rb19_2Fd9_6, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 19.2kbs, Fd = 9.6kHz GFSK_Rb38_4Fd19_6, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 38.4kbs, Fd = 19.6kHz GFSK_Rb57_6Fd28_8, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 57.6kbs, Fd = 28.8kHz GFSK_Rb125Fd125, ///< GFSK, No Manchester, Rb = 125kbs, Fd = 125kHz OOK_Rb1_2Bw75, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 1.2kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 75kHz OOK_Rb2_4Bw335, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 2.4kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz OOK_Rb4_8Bw335, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 4.8kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz OOK_Rb9_6Bw335, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 9.6kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz OOK_Rb19_2Bw335, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 19.2kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz OOK_Rb38_4Bw335, ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 38.4kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz OOK_Rb40Bw335 ///< OOK, No Manchester, Rb = 40kbs, Rx Bandwidth = 335kHz } ModemConfigChoice;
RH_RF22.h

the rest can then be used as normal – remember to alter the main Arduino sketch code to select these new bps rates.

NB: I am based in the UK/Europe; we always use wide deviation for POCSAG signals (although much other PMR traffic is now on narrow deviation).

If your country’s Communications Ministry requires narrow deviation to be used you will have to recalculate the modem settings using the spreadsheet referred to in the library files. (Its not as bad as it might seem; I had to use it to get the 1200/2400bps settings and I am not an RF nor a coding expert by any means)

 

Jul 182015
 

Yesterday I was watching a news documentary about the BNetzA (German Communications Ministry) at work with a Peilwagen (radio tracking vehicle) searching out stray signals that caused havoc with vehicle alarm/lock systems and TV-sets for some kilometres around and even got into the communications systems of the aircraft.

It turned out that the middle aged couples complaining about the interference had accidentally caused it themselves by defects in cheap gadgets like weather stations (the signal had also cut across the DWD’s far more accurate weather stations) and animal scarers!

In one bit the BNetzA chap got an urgent call from Bremen aerodrome because of “Störung durch Pfeifton” on aviation frequencies. A Pfeifton (as its name suggests) is a high pitched sound that may or may not be wanted (it can mean the ringtone on a mobile (Handy)). it is definitely unwanted on those frequencies. Not just Angst but Gefahr; DE has had plenty enough trouble with aircraft recently.

The facial expressions of the BNetzA chap and the way he said Pfeifton made it clear whatever was causing it would be made to pipe down – at ARCEP in France he might be equally likely to pipe his eye 😉 )

Also: bald muß die BNetzA mit dem Peilwagen für den Pfeifton suchen.

(I might even have got at least half of the cases and genders right in the above [in German the govt, police agencies are always feminine] 😉 )

but there are times when the Pfeifton is desirable:

you can hear and see it on the spectrum display (it is the two brighter yellow lines). The Pfeifton is part of the Signal, but the rest of the yellow is Rausch (noise, but can also mean the effect of booze or drugs!).

“cq cq cq de ddh47 ddh9 ddh8” means that everyone who can receive the signal is permitted to monitor it – BNetZA have licensed the Deutscher Wetterdienst to transmit it, Ofcom, Agentschap Telecom, ARCEP etc allow you to monitor it because we are in the EU (it wasn’t always the case!).

DDH47/DDH9/DDH8 are the callsigns to identify the transmitter (required by international law).

more info about it (in German) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDH47

if you look at the wave display you can see why they also send “ryryryryryryryryryryryryryryry”.

even with a 20 000W TX there is a lot of interference on LF (worse on HF) – because of the type of signal used (an upper sideband) you also need a radio receiver which can generate the Pfeifton using a special circuit.

The signal I am decoding is at 147.3 KHz so why is the radio tuned to a different frequency? 147.3 – 146.01 Khz = 1.29 Khz – just right to make an audio signal strong enough to get above the noise.

if the sound is familiar from those documentaries about Bletchley Park; that is because its exactly the same signal! Today its used for more peaceful purposes – eventually you get messages like this

and the stuff which looks like “secret codes” if decoded on a Linux machine (doesn’t work on Windows even with the same software) is actually just the weather; except from ships at sea or weather monitoring stations.

This weather boat is funded by the EU and operated by (I think) the French Navy – BATEU00 = bateau (fr) 😉

By now you probably are wondering – why go to all this trouble in the 21st century when you can get the weather info online?

one reason is much of the online stuff for Europe is the exact same data but processed via private companies in USA who know little about Europe’s geography and introduce flaws into the data, in the UK the BBC and Met Office computer links regularly go wrong.

Doing this also unearths any particularly bad interference from gadgets in your building or if the Russians are doing anything sketchy – the small weather boat (which often does some surveillance work as well) is sent elsewhere or told to switch off its radio transmitters unless its an emergency); a lack of weather reports from any European country which isn’t obviously too skint to keep their weather service working also means something unusual is going on. There is always Weather in Europe.

Particularly rough weather means even the Russians stop with all of their spying as well (and even warn Europe of any particularly harsh weather, usually via Norway). Germans and Dutch call that “Unweather” (something so bad it is dangerous to everyone on land, sea and in the air). This whole setup doesn’t even need the Internet; as long as there is some electricity to keep the radio receiver and relatively old netbook going it will operate and this can be done with equipment older than I am…

Sep 122014
 

Weather faxes and RTTY from Germany and UK; plus some of the equipment used

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK

weatherfaxes - DE and UK